A House becomes Home

Front Door

The construction door is gone.  In its’ place is a beautiful, reclaimed wood, front door that opens to say ‘welcome home’ to Desert Rain owners, Barbara Scott and Tom Elliott. It has been a long journey from their idea and dream of building an extreme green home to this week of moving in. After nearly five years of dreaming, planning, purchasing property, designing, permits, redesigning and construction – Desert Rain and the adjacent accessory dwelling unit are ready for occupancy.

The walkway and Miro wall create a guide to the front door.

The walkway and Miro wall create a guide to the front door.

 

 

Ground-breaking began in August 2011. Striving to meet the stringent guidelines and the seven petals of the Living Building Challenge created hurdles and delays far beyond what an owner or contractor would encounter with traditional construction. The Desert Rain team has embraced the challenge and found the answers to keep the project moving forward to completion of a livable home.

Tom, Lee, and Anna tackle another trailer load.

Tom, Lee, and Anna tackle another trailer load.

One obstacle remains before Barb and Tom can begin the one year auditing phase that will monitor the water, energy and air quality systems to show that Desert Rain meets the LBC criteria for certification. The blackwater system (waste water treatment from toilets and the dishwasher) has not yet been approved. Plans for the system were in the process of design and engineering well before construction began.  After many months of research, design, and working with the regulatory agencies involved in permits a proposal for the blackwater system should be ready to submit this week. (Stay tuned for more information in a future blog). In the meantime, Tom and Barb will be utilizing city systems that were required to be in place for the initial permit process.

Tom and Anna carry the infamous 'blue bucket'. The bucket holds thousands of nails that were saved from the deconstruction of the original two houses. Barb hopes to see the nails used in an art project.

Tom and Anna carry the infamous ‘blue bucket’. The bucket holds thousands of nails that were saved from the deconstruction of the original two houses. Barb hopes to see the nails used in an art project.

Living in a net zero water and net zero energy home will require a commitment to lifestyle that Barb and Tom believe they can embrace. With the bleeding edge design, construction, and systems in place Desert Rain is not an ordinary house. The mechanical room, monitoring equipment, solar panels, and technology are highly visible – a daily reminder to be conscious of meeting the LBC requirements.

 

Living a normal life within the parameters of the LBC may be a challenge. In a recent interview with the  Bend Bulletin, Barb said, “We don’t know how this works because we’ve never done it, nor has anyone else”. Barb and Tom are confident they will find the balance between the mechanical and technical elements that are imperative to a functioning house and the LBC, and the comfort and beauty that will make Desert Rain House their home.

A lone chair exemplifies the activity of moving. Where does it go? Where is its' place?

A lone chair exemplifies the activity of moving. Where is its’ place? Where is its’ home within the home?

 

Barb stops to excitedly see a favorite item being unloaded.

Barb stops her moving of boxes to excitedly see a favorite item being unloaded.

With the chaos of moving well underway, Barb and Tom are turning house to home.  The harmony of home and extreme green building will be created when: a favorite wooden salad bowl finds a place in the Forest Stewardship Council certified cabinet; a steaming cup of tea waits on the salvaged, walnut countertop; an old farm table from Montana reflects the sunlight streaming through the triple pane, energy-efficient glass doors; treasured art pieces grace the walls that are covered with American Clay. When the view from each window becomes familiar; when shoes are parked in the entryway; when friends and family are welcomed with warm hugs; when music and laughter flow to the ceilings; when sense of place brings a sense of sanctuary – Desert Rain House will no longer be a project. Desert Rain House will become –home.

The beauty of the FSC wood cabinets, the salvaged walnut shelf, and a well-known salad bowl create 'home'.

The beauty of the FSC wood cabinets, the salvaged walnut shelf, and a well-known salad bowl create ‘home’.

Congratulations Tom and Barb!   May your pioneering spirit, your commitment to values, your belief in the Living Building Challenge, and your love of earth and life – bring you HOME.

 

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *